How to select an appropriate/optimal Tag/Build ID

I’m trying to setup the development environment for Dragonboard 410c, in my laptop running Ubuntu 16.04.
According to P.8 of Software Build and Installation Guide, Linux Android M80-P0436-2 Rev J December 2016, I should go to https://wiki.codeaurora.org/xwiki/bin/QAEP/release and choose one Tag/Build ID. I’m wondering what the criterion I should use to select an appropriate/optimal Tag/Build ID?
Here are few information about my desired DB410c configuration:
OS: Debian only and no Android
Debian version: dragonboard-410c-sdcard-developer-buster-528.img

That will only get you something around android 5 or 6, and loaded with qualcomm hacks.
This is what you really want;

I think you are following the wrong document. The Software Build and Installation Guide, Linux Android is Android documentation (e.g. Android/Linux) but you say you want to run Debian (e.g. GNU/Linux).

You’d be better off working through one of the blog posts on cross compiling for GNU/Linux systems. A 96Boards specific one is found here:

Hi @doitright,
Thank you for your reply.
Yes, you are right: It looks more like what I need.

Actually my target is to learn what is taught in “Interfacing I2C Grove Digital Light Sensor” (https://youtu.be/1c3Epva9hCc):

  1. Update kernel config
  2. Update device tree
  3. Build the kernel
  4. Connect the hardware
  5. Flash the new boot-image

In that video the tutor suggests to study Software Build and Installation Guide, Linux Android, so I assume it’s what I should start with.

In https://www.96boards.org/documentation/consumer/dragonboard/guides/aosp/, it describes how to get Android environemnt and warns: “It might take quite a bit of time to fetch the entire AOSP source code!”
Since I won’t use Android, can I simply skip getting Android source and just get linux kernel?

Hi @danielt,
Thank you for your reply.
In my original post I should clarify that what I want is simply to know how to work with Dragonboard 410c’s linux kernel. Cross compiling normal linux application has already been done.
Thanks for your kind help, anyway!

Well, generally, you want to stick with the kernel that is configured for the OS that you are intending to use, so if you’re not going to build and use Android, you probably should find the appropriate source code and guide matching Debian, as @danielt pointed out.

Hi @doitright,
Sure, that’s important.
Thanks for reminding me!